Jul 4, 2005

How am I presiding?

You've seen the bumper sticker, HOW AM I DRIVING? When a motorist sees the driver of a commercial or public vehicle driving discourteously or recklessly, he can call the attendant toll-free number and report the infraction.

I have often thought that it would be a good idea to make a bumper sticker for bishops and priests that says: HOW AM I PRESIDING?* And then all one would have to do is dial the toll free hotline to Pope Benedict XVI and get the guy busted for "presiding" recklessly without regard for God, the safety of souls and the liturgical norms.

(* For a somewhat tangential but excellent essay on the dreadful terms "presider" and "presiding", go HERE).
I am happy to say that the folks at ADOREMUS have come up with a much better idea (the bumper sticker idea was never a serious one, by the way). They have developed a SURVEY that allows Catholics (lay and ordained) to assess how the provisions of Redemptionis Sacramentum are being implemented in their parishes and dioceses.

About the ADOREMUS SURVEY:

A year ago the Holy See issued Redemptionis Sacramentum, an Instruction subtitled “On certain matters to be observed or to be avoided regarding the Most Holy Eucharist”. Dated March 25, 2004, it is the “prescriptive document” called for by Pope John Paul II in his last encyclical, Ecclesia de Eucharistia (May 2003), and is intended to “help to banish the dark clouds of unacceptable doctrine and practice, so that the Eucharist will continue to shine forth in all its radiant mystery”. On October 7, 2004, Pope John Paul II issued Mane Nobiscum Domine, and declared the beginning of the Year of the Eucharist, to conclude with a synod of the world’s bishops on the subject of the Eucharist to be held in Rome October 2-23, as confirmed by Pope Benedict XVI.

[one] ... focus of [Adoremus'] observance of the Year of the Eucharist is to survey implementation of Redemptionis Sacramentum during the past year. Its corrective provisions were to be implemented immediately. The survey questions concern practices that the document calls “grave matters”. The completed survey forms will be tabulated by Adoremus, and the results will be sent to the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments.
No bumper stickers. No 888 numbers. But you can be sure that you will be heard. Remember that Jesuit Father Joseph Fessio has been a major impetus behind ADOREMUS and he is also very close to Pope Benedict XVI.

Go HERE for the survey and don't delay. The deadline for returning it to ADOREMUS is AUGUST 1, 2005.

4 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

I think this is an excellent idea. I like Adoremus' poll and will respond to it. (I have been a member of Adoremus for several years.)

It happens that about the only problem at my geographic parish is the priests' making relatively few but significant changes to the words of the Mass. ("...east to west, north to south..."; omitting any indication of penitence from the penitential rite &c).

But one need go only one suburb north or south to find occasional rainbow vestments and many wild divergences from the texts.

I am not in Cardinal Roger's diocese but in another California one farther north. My archbishop is not yet a cardinal but will be soon, when he gets to his new job in Rome.

2:53 PM  
Anonymous paul said...

San Francisco, right?

3:24 PM  
Blogger Clayton said...

That "east to west and north to south" nonsense is a silly innovation, I imagine done in the interest of being inclusive... (don't want to hurt the feelings of the other two directions).

In the ancient texts, the reference "from east to west" could be translated as "from the rising of the sun to its setting." Unless the sun begins rising in the north and setting in the south from time to time, this modification of the Eucharistic prayer seems unwarranted.

4:45 AM  
Anonymous Quintero said...

If the earth suffers a "deep impact" meteor collision, the "north to south" business might actually become geographically correct, but still liturgically wrong.

7:11 AM  

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